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Like A Melting Snow … Wash Yourself Of Yourself …


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When I am silent …

I fall into that place …

Where everything is music …

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Click here to Read more :  http://www.narges.eu/index.php/inspirational-words/like-a-melting-snow

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Waiting for the time when the word “Discrimination” is no longer exist in any dictionary…


“You can forget those who hurt you physically
And forgive those who hurt you emotionally,
but you can never
Forget or Forgive
Those who discriminated against you personally.”

Flo14wer

http://narges.eu/index.php/inspirational-words/discrimination

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http://www.narges.eu/

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Campaign For Saving Urmia Lake



Urmia Lake, planet’s third largest salt lake is shrinking. Lake’s surrounding is one the most beautiful and environmentally sensitive areas. Unfortunately neither the local authorities nor the international institutions have paid sufficient attention and care for saving the lake. Support to save the lake.

http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/urmugulu/

Flamingos at Lake Urmia

Flamingos at Lake Urmia

More than 211 species of birds such as flamingos, pelicans, spoonbills, and gulls, 41 species of reptiles, 7 species of amphibians, and 27 species of mammals such as yellow deer inhabit the lake.

The lake is marked by more than one hundred small rocky islands, which are stopover points in the migration of various birds. Flamingos are known to breed in large numbers at Lake Urmia as many as 25,000 breeding pairs.

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Chehel Sotoun


This great Safavid Palace was one of nearly 300 built in Isfahan when it was the capital of Iran. It was largely completed under Shah Abbas II (1642-1667), although work may have started on the palace as early as 1598, and is said to derive its name from the pillars which dominate the verandah. There are twenty of these laid out in three rows of six with two additional ones on either side of the main entrance. When these are reflected in the water of the pool the number is made up to forty, the Farsi for which is “chehel – 40”. However the number forty is also used to signify a large number as in the Minaret of Chehel Dokhtaran.

The magnificent talar or verandah, is the dominant feature of the palace and the slender columns, over 40m tall, which support it are cut from single chenar trees (platanus orientalis). The roof is also made from chenar tree beams and inset with complex decoration. The surface of much of the throne room is still covered with mirrored glass and this probably also was used on the pillars, as it was in the palace of Ali Qapu, so as to give the appearance of a roof floating in the air.

Looking out over the pool from the Verandah, one is able to appreciate the importance attached historically by Persians to the concept of “talar” which fulfilled their love of sitting in the garden while they were protected from the light and heat.

Behind the verandah there is a small raised throne room which leads into a spacious audience chamber. This is richly decorated with paintings celebrating the heyday of the Safavid dynasty, including a particularly celebrated one of Shah Tahmasb receiving the Mughul Emperor Homayun at a banquet. There are also some paintings of a more secular nature, depicting ladies lying in gardens and hunting scenes, although these have been badly defaced. On the outside of the building there are some particularly interesting pictures of european figures, presumably based on the ambassadors and their retinue who would have stayed in the palace from time to time.

Interesting aspects of the Chehel Sotoun (Sotoon) Palace are:{mosimage}

The stone lions at the four corners of the central pool, the hall and marble and vaulted cornices around it.
The gilded adornments, paintings and the portrait of the sovereign in the royal hall. Along with that of the chambers surrounding the hall of mirrors.
The portrait of Shah Abbas I with the special crown and the miniatures of the treasury room.
Several facades such as the ‘Qotbiyeh Mosque’, ‘Zaviyeh in Kushk’, and the imprints of the ‘Dar-e-Joubareh’ and ‘Aqasi Mosque’ are affixed in the western and southern walls of the garden. The hall and porches of this palace were constructed during the fifth year of the reign of Shah Abbas II. The reflection of the twenty pillars of the hall in the pool opposite the palace brings about a conception of forty pillars. Hence the name Chehel Sotune.

As with Ali Qapu, the palace contains many frescoes and paintings on ceramic. Many of the ceramic panels have been dispersed and are now in the possession of major museums in the west. They depict specific historical scenes such as a reception for an Uzbek King in 1646, when the palace had just been completed; a banquet in honor of the Emir of Bukhara in 1611; the battle of Chalderan against the Ottoman Sultan Selim II in 1514 in which the Persians fought without firearms; the welcome extended to the Mughal Emperor,Humayun who took refuge in Iran in 1544; the battle of Taher-Abad in 1510 where the Safavid Shah Ismail I vanquished and killed the Uzbek King. A more recent painting depicts Nadir Shah’s victory against the Indian Army at Karnal in 1739. There are also less historical, but even more aesthetic compositions in the traditional miniature style which celebrate the joy of life and love.

This building – now a veritable museum of Persian painting and ceramics-was a pleasure pavilion used for the king’s entertainments and receptions. It stands inside a vast royal park, but relatively near the enclosure, and was built by Shah Abbas II round an earlier building erected by Shah Abbas I. An inscription states that the decoration and frescoes were finished in 1647. Only two large historical frescoes date from the later period of the Zand dynasty.

Unfortunately, the Chehel Sotun has been badly damaged since then, especially when the Afghans occupied the town and covered the paintings with a thick coat of whitewash. It is now being extensively restored under the aegis of the Institute Italian Per il Medio Oriente.

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Safavid Period Architecture


 

Iran - Isfahan

Safavid art refers to art in Persia (Iran) during the dynasty of the same name (1501-1722), a high point for the art of the book and architecture; other art at the time included ceramics, metal and glass.

Iran - Esfahan

Iran - Esfahan

For the third time in the history of the Safavids, the capital of the empire changed under Shah Abbas: to Isfahan, a city in a more centralized location than Tabriz or Qazvin (which is between Tehran and Tabriz). A new capital was thus set up beside the ancient city, organized around a meydan, a large place 512 metres long by 159 wide.

Iran - Esfahan

On one side stands the Shah’s mosque, on the other the Shah’s oratory, called the mosque of Sheikh Lutfallah, while the pavilion Ali Qapu opens onto a large pleasure walkway (Chahar Bagh) and the grand bazaar led to the old mosque on Fridays. Two bridges cross the Zayandeh River, leading to an Armenian section taking the name of Nea Julfa.

 
 
 
 
 

Iran - Isfahan

 

 

Iran - Isfahan

Chaharbagh school
 
A tiling collection, The Madresse chaharbagh, or royal school, also named after the king’s mother; is one of the last, but otherwise most beautiful works of Safavid period architecture. It was built at the time of Shah Sultan Hussain, the last of the safavid kings. The building also displays the art of tile work at its best. It is an example of late Safavid period tile work. On the eastern wing of the school was the king’s mother caravansary, a place for travellers to rest. Today it has been turned into the magnificent Abbasi Hotel, itself a museum of post-Safavid works of art. (17th century after Christ).

Iran - Isfahan

 

 

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Innocent World


Kids spell love T-I-M-E. 

There are two lasting bequests we can give our children. One is roots. The other is wings.

My Nephew

Our children need our presence more than our presents!

My Nephew

We Shouldn’t worry that children never listen to us; we should worry that they are always watching us! 

There is only one pretty child in the world, and every mother has it! 

My Nephew

 

If there is anything that we wish to change in the child, we should first examine it and see whether it is not something that could better be changed in ourselves. 

My Nephew

 

It’s not only children who grow.  Parents do too.  As much as we watch to see what our children do with their lives, they are watching us to see what we do with ours.  I can’t tell my children to reach for the sun.  All I can do is reach for it, myself.

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Pearl Of The Desert


Ancient castle in Rayen – Iran
 
 
 
The history of human settlements in the territory of Kerman dates back to the 4th millennium BC. This area is considered as one of the ancient regions of Iran and valuable historical vestiges have been discovered here. Jiroft is an example, where a previously unknown settlement dating back to around 2500BC has just been established by archeologists. Kerman has an abundance of historical sites and landmarks, 283 in total, according to Iran’s Cultural Heritage Organization. Ancient abandoned citadels such as Arg-é Bam and Rayen castle have been preserved in the desert for two thousand years.
  
 
 
 
Rayen is a city in Kerman (province). Rayen is everything Bam used to be before the earthquake. Rayen has a historic Arg (fortress) built entirely of sun-dried mud bricks. Its historic city has countless mudbrick houses, some of them unfortunately decaying, but it is this decaying charm that makes the city even more attractive.
Arg-e Rayen was inhabited until 150 years ago and, although believed to be at least thousands years old, may in fact have foundations from the pre-Islamic Sassanid era.
 
 
 
 
The planning and architecture of the citadel are thought out from different points of view. From the present form of the citadel one can see that the planner(s) had foreseen the entire final form of the building and city from the first steps in the planning process. During each phase of building development the already-built part enjoyed a complete figure, and each additional part could be “sewn” into the existing section seamlessly.
 
 
 
The citadel is situated in the center of the fortress-city, on the point with widest view for security. When the gate of the city was closed, no human or animal could enter. The inhabitants could continue living for a long period of time in isolation as they had access to a well, gardens, and domestic animals inside. When the fortress-city was besieged the inhabitants could remain in the city while the soldiers could defend it, protected by high walls and towers.
 
 
 
 
All buildings are made of non-baked clay bricks, i.e. adobes. Bam Citadel was, prior to the 2003 earthquake, the biggest adobe structure in the world and then Rayen Castle (Arg-é Rayen).
 
 

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